Participants wanted for SWARM study

Would you like to help in some research on the regulation of what future AI-driven nanomedicines should look like? If so, we are looking for volunteers to discuss ethical and regulatory issues of using AI driven cancer therapies with swarm behaviour through a series of interviews.

The research is part of the SWARM study – Small robots With collective behaviour as AI-driven cancer therapies; building Regulations for future nanoMedicines.

We are looking for:

  • Oncology healthcare professionals
  • Cancer patients
  • Regulatory or policymakers in drug delivery/oncology
  • Nanomedicine researcher or developers

Volunteers must be over the age of 18 years old to take part. We would love to hear from you. You can find out more about the study on our SWARM study webpage or by contacting Matimba Swana at matimba.swana@bristol.ac.uk.

If you would like to take part please complete this Expression of Interest Form.

Job opportunity: Research Associate in Trustworthy Uncrewed Air Vehicles (UAVs)

This exciting research position sets out to develop flight control systems for Uncrewed Air Vehicles (UAVs) based on machine learning. You will be developing reinforcement learning based flight control systems for micro quadcopters and hybrid flight control systems for morphing wing UAVs. You will then experimentally test and validate these using advanced free flight and wind tunnel testing facilities.

This position is part of the multidisciplinary UKRI Trustworthy Autonomous Systems Node in Functionality which explores how to develop trustworthy adaptive autonomous systems. You will be part of a large multidisciplinary team of researchers from ethics, sociology, computer science and engineering working together to develop design-for-trustworthiness techniques for a wide range of autonomous systems, including swarm robotics, soft robots, and unmanned air vehicles.

The position will be based at the Bristol Robotics Laboratory the largest centre for multidisciplinary research in the UK. This position will also involve close interaction with the Bio-inspired Flight Lab and the Bristol Flight Lab at the University of Bristol.

Visit the University jobs site for full details of the position including how to apply online.

Vacancy summary

Research Associate/Senior Research Associate in Trustworthy Uncrewed Air Vehicles (UAVs) (Job ref. ACAD105941)
Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Bristol
Salary: £34,304 to £43,434
Closing date: 10 April 2022

For informal enquiries contact: Dr Shane Windsor or Katie Drury

Participants wanted for ethics study

Would you like to help in some research on the ethics of robots? If so, we are looking for volunteers to discuss ethical issues around robots and autonomous systems that are capable of learning from their surroundings and changing what they do.

The research is part of the ARET: Adaptable Robots, Ethics, and Trust study. In old English ‘aret’ means ‘to ‘entrust’, and ‘arête’ is a term used by Ancient Greek philosophers to indicate moral virtue or excellence.

If you are aged 18 or over, we would love to hear from you. You do not need to have any previous knowledge of autonomous systems to participate as we will show you images and videos to introduce you to the technologies.

You can find out more about the study on our ARET: Adaptable Robots, Ethics, and Trust study webpage or by contacting Arianna Manzini at arianna.manzini@bristol.ac.uk.

If you would like to take part please complete this volunteer form.

Powering emergency food distribution using swarms: Results from the DOTS competition are in

Find out how robots called DOTS (Distributed Organisation and Transport Systems) were used to help simulate the distribution of emergency food parcels in a competition run jointly by the Bristol Robotics Laboratory, Toshiba Bristol Research and Innovation Laboratory and the South Gloucestershire Council’s UMBRELLA project.

Increases in the number of emergency food parcels distributed by food banks have accelerated over the course of the coronavirus pandemic, particularly in those going to children. Robot swarms could help streamline the distribution of these emergency food parcels, while freeing up time for volunteers and workers to interface with the users and provide human contact.

Read about how participants in the competition brainstormed and engineered solutions to tackle the challenge and watch their simulations on the RoboHub website.